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Posts Tagged ‘meditation’


Lately I find it hard to keep my eyes open while studying, and difficult to stop from yawning in the middle of work. How can a girl concentrate on anything while wishing she was snuggled up in bed falling fast asleep? She can’t! It has become clear that I need more energy, so I decided to do a little research to see what I can do to give myself a boost. Here are some of the best tips I came up with – I guarantee you’ve heard some of these before, but some of them, or the ways some of them are meant to be done, were certainly new to me.

  1. Get Enough Sleep
    We’ve all heard this one. The “you need your rest” mantra we hated as kids, but now miss oh so much. Seriously though, get at least 8 hours of sleep a night. You’d be surprised how much it helps.
  2. Eat Breakfast
    Breakfast really is the most important meal of the day. Don’t skip it. Even if it’s just grabbing a granola bar as you race out the door, or grabbing an apple or banana from the break room at work. It’ll make a difference to how you get your day going.
  3. Drink Enough Water
    8 glasses a day ladies! 6 of those glasses are supposedly best to drink before 3pm because that’s when your body does most of it’s flushing out of your systems, so re-hydrating will help that process, as well as keep you ready for action AND (this is always a plus) help keep your skin looking great.
  4. Rub/Tug On Your Earlobes
    According to Chinese medicine, stimulating your earlobes also sends stimulation to the rest of your body. It also helps draw blood to your head and gets it flowing. So give your ears a little massage and a few gentle tugs when you’re feeling drowsy.
  5. Stretch
    Sitting around all day is enough to make anyone drowsy. Get up and stretch, let your body get some movement. You’ll notice that you perk up a bit.
  6. Work Out
    Working out releases endorphins, which in turn, release energy into your body. That pumped up feeling you get after working out? That would be those endorphins.
  7. Try Deep Breathing & Meditation
    Deep breathing allows more oxygen to get into your system, giving your body more to work with. Let your stomach inflate as you inhale slowly and deeply through your nose, and deflate as you exhale slowly through your mouth, pushing out the air until you can’t anymore. Meditation and visualization can help bring you to a place where you feel fresher and are ready to tackle anything at hand. Meditation however, does take practice. But don’t give up! I promise you that once you master it, it is well worth it.
  8. Take Power Naps
    No, not hour-long ones. Believe it or not, the perfect power nap lasts only 15-20 minutes. This way, your body only has time to go into the first stage of sleep, rather than going deeper and not having enough time to come out of it properly. Anything over 20 minutes can lead to waking up more exhausted than before. So set that alarm!
  9. Eat Healthy, Balanced Meals
    Making sure to eat healthy and regularly is an important life skill. It helps to nourish your body and get the right nutrients into your system as the day goes on. Choose healthy snacks as well, to ensure that you are getting your energy from the correct places, and also to help you keep up your energy longer.
  10. Play
    Remember how you could run around for hours as a kid? Well that’s because you loved it! Get out daily and play – literally. Do something fun with your kids, your pet, or a friend. Do something you enjoy. Make time for you to have some fun.
  11. Re-evaluate Your Relationships
    Relationships can easily drain you of your energy. If you constantly have to argue with someone, work hard at keeping up a relationship, or give and not get anything back, you need to take a long hard look at those relationships. There’s a fine line between putting in the effort, and being taken advantage of or being worn down. Be careful.
  12. Take Your Vitamins 
    Taking a vitamin supplement can help boost your energy (whether you have a vitamin deficiency or not) and make you healthier overall.

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Meditation is a great way to get inspiration. If you’re seeking comfort, peace, and calm, then meditation may be the right tactic for you. Meditation can help bring forward subconscience thoughts and feelings, as well and allowing you to get in tune with your inner self. Its used for relaxation, some medicinal purposes, and side by side with yoga. Give it a try and find the right kind of meditaiton for you sepecifically with my 10 Days of Meditation.

Dhyana (Cross-Heart Kirtan Kriya Meditation)

Step by Step

1. Sit in Sukhasana (Easy Pose) with a straight spine. Close your eyes and then open them just a little bit. Stare at the tip of your nose. Meditating here will help still a noisy mind.

2. Cross the forearms below the wrists, in front of the chest. Prepare to work with the mantra Sa-Ta-Na-Ma.

Saa – Infinity
Taa – Life
Naa – Transformation
Maa – Rebirth

3. Begin to chant, Saa – taa – naa – maa as you play the fingers by touching the thumb tip to the fingertips in the following fashion:

Saa – touch the tip of the thumbs to the index fingers
Taa – touch the tip of the thumbs to the middle fingers
Naa – touch the tip of the thumbs to the ring fingers
Maa – touch the tip of the thumbs to the pinkie fingers

4. Continue for 11 minutes. To end, inhale, hold, close the eyes, and become completely still. Relax. The hemispheres will balance; a new sense of peace will ensue.

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Meditation is a great way to get inspiration. If you’re seeking comfort, peace, and calm, then meditation may be the right tactic for you. Meditation can help bring forward subconscience thoughts and feelings, as well and allowing you to get in tune with your inner self. Its used for relaxation, some medicinal purposes, and side by side with yoga. Give it a try and find the right kind of meditaiton for you sepecifically with my 10 Days of Meditation.

Dhyana (Calm Heart Meditation)

Step by Step

1. To begin, find a comfortable posture for meditation (seated on a cushion or blanket, in a chair, or against a wall). It may be helpful to set a timer for 10, 20, or 30 minutes so you can deepen your meditation without being distracted by the time. You may also want to gently ring a bell at the beginning and end of your meditation.

2. Place your hands on your knees in Jnana mudra (index and thumb touching), with palms facing up to open your awareness or palms facing down to calm the mind. Scan your body and relax any tension you feel. Let your spine rise from the base of the pelvis. Draw your chin slightly down and let the back of your neck lengthen.

3. Bring your awareness to the center of your chest. To draw your mind into meditation, start to repeat the sound Om with each exhalation. You can chant Om silently at your heart region or out loud, letting the sound emanate from your chest, as though you have lips on your heart.

4. Let the sound vibrate like a gong, where the sound of Om ripples in all directions. As you work with the sound, feel that each Om widens your heart like a great lake. As you stay with the Om, feel that your heart is being washed of any unnecessary gripping, tension, or feeling.

5. Next up is the Skeptic. Before asking the Controller to speak with the Skeptic, however, take a deep breath; when you shift into another voice, it’s good to give the mental movement a physical correlation.

6. When you are ready, bring your hands together in Anjali Mudra (Salutation Seal) and complete your meditation with a moment of gratitude, reflection, or prayer to integrate the energy of your meditation into your life. You can bring your awareness to your heart anytime throughout the day to return to the seat of unconditional love.

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Meditation is a great way to get inspiration. If you’re seeking comfort, peace, and calm, then meditation may be the right tactic for you. Meditation can help bring forward subconscience thoughts and feelings, as well and allowing you to get in tune with your inner self. Its used for relaxation, some medicinal purposes, and side by side with yoga. Give it a try and find the right kind of meditaiton for you sepecifically with my 10 Days of Meditation.

Dhyana (Big Mind Meditation)

Step by Step

1. If you already have a regular meditation routine, do a minute or two of it to get grounded and comfortable, and maintain your usual posture. If you’re new to meditation, find a comfortable upright position (sitting in a chair is sufficient), take a few deep breaths, and relax as much as you can. Set aside 25 minutes for the entire practice.

2. From your relaxed meditation position, ask yourself to speak with your Controller. (You’ll probably feel a bit strange speaking to yourself this way, but you’re simply giving voice to the running dialogue that already exists inside your head.) The Controller is essentially your ego. Its job, as its name implies, is to control. You’ve likely met and probably struggle with this aspect of yourself.

3. Ask the Controller about its job, then probe further and ask what it controls—your actions, your thoughts, other people? This is neither good nor bad; the Controller is just doing its job. A key component of the Big Mind process is gaining the Controller’s—the ego’s—cooperation and not threatening it with annihilation, as spiritual training often does.

4. Once you gain the Controller’s trust, you can ask it for permission to speak with your other voices; the ego is usually glad to temporarily step aside if it has been consulted.

5. Next up is the Skeptic. Before asking the Controller to speak with the Skeptic, however, take a deep breath; when you shift into another voice, it’s good to give the mental movement a physical correlation.

6. Let the Skeptic be what it is. It’s OK that a part of you is skeptical; it’s actually a good thing. If you didn’t have a skeptical voice, you might find yourself continually being hoodwinked. Ask the Skeptic what it has doubts about.

7. Now take a breath and ask to speak with Seeking Mind. Shift over to this new voice. Meditators often have a problem with Seeking Mind; they want to get rid of it, because it creates so much desire. But Seeking Mind is doing what it’s meant to do. It’s helpful to remember that without it, you might not be meditating in the first place.

8. Take another breath and shift to Nonseeking Mind. Nonseeking Mind is the state of meditation. There is nowhere to go, nothing to do. Again, this is neither good nor bad; Nonseeking Mind simply doesn’t seek. Explore Nonseeking Mind.

9. Take a moment here to notice how easy or hard it is to shift from one voice to another. Moving among your different selves helps you realize the empty nature of the self—that is, you have no static identity; you are continually changing. You might think your identity is set in stone (I am shy, I am angry, I am spiritual), but these are just voices floating in space; they’re not you. You’re much bigger than you think.

10. Now take a breath and shift into Big Mind. This is the voice that contains all the other voices. It is known by various names: the ground of being, Buddha Mind, Universal Mind, God. By its very nature, it has no beginning and no end. There is nothing outside of Big Mind, but Big Mind is a voice inside of you. Big Mind’s job, you could say, is just to be.

11. Ask Big Mind what it does and doesn’t contain. Does it contain your birth? Your parents’ birth? Your death? Can you find its beginning or end? Does it contain your other voices? How does it see your daily problems?

12. Stay in Big Mind for as long as you can. In this state, you have surrendered your personal ego (with its permission) to your true and universal nature.

13. Next, find your voice of Big Heart. Explore what it does for you and others. Its job is to be compassionate. How does it respond when someone or something is hurting? Does it take the form of tough love or tender nurturing or both? Does it have any limits when faced with suffering? Sit with this voice for a while.

14. Now shift back into Nonseeking Mind and stay with it for a couple minutes to end the meditation. Though you might want to stay in Big Mind forever, the simple fact is that no single voice is the stopping place; there is no stopping place. Continually working with and accepting all of your voices will, in turn, help you accept the myriad voices of others.

Once learned, the Big Mind process can be used at any time during meditation practice or throughout the day. If you’re feeling particularly angry during meditation, you can connect with Angry Self, let it have its say, and move into Nonseeking Mind or Big Mind. Play with your various voices and see what you can find.

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The following yoga tips can help you reenergize, refocus, and realign.

1. Better than caffeine? When you feel yourself dragging at the end of a long, hard day at work, it might seem intuitive to race to the closest coffee shop for a pick-me-up, but a short yoga stretch at your desk may do the trick. Try this energizing pose you can do at your desk. On an inhalation, lift your chest, making a high backbend. Stay here and draw three full, rich breaths into your body. As you exhale, release your hands, place them on your knees and round your spine. Tuck your pelvis and pull your navel away from your knees, coming into a seated Cat Pose. Let your head dangle to open the back of the neck. Repeat several times. (For more information see Office Yoga Tips.)

2. Take a deep breath. Your breath is a relaxation tool that never leaves you. You can access it at work, while you’re running errands, or whenever you feel stressed. Why not try it now? Close your eyes and observe as you take 10 slow, deep breaths in and out through the nostrils. When you’re done you’ll feel calmer, more centered, and more focused. (For more information see Inhale, Exhale, Relax.)

3. Go for a mindful walk. When you think of meditation, you may think of something very serious and focused, but the practice of meditation includes a wide range of techniques you can practice anytime, including many that are appropriate for a mid-day yoga break at home or in the office. To do a walking meditation, simply keep your mind in the present as you take a mindful walk around the office or the block. The idea is not to walk to get somewhere, but simply to enjoy the walk. (For more information see Meditation in Motion.)

4. Pamper your peepers. If you work with computers, detailed documents, or small objects that strain your eyes, you may find that your vision starts to get fuzzy by the end of the day. Taking a break from the intense concentration of work—whatever work you do—is good for everyone. The yogic practice of withdrawing from the senses (Pratyahara) can be both spiritual and mental. When we close our eyes, we move into ourselves and away from the external world. This creates a deep sense of peace. On a physical level, closing our eyes can protect them, calm our bodies, lower our blood pressure, and make it possible for us to concentrate for longer periods of time. So take a yoga break at your desk, or wherever you are, during your work day. Close your door, close your eyes, and surrender to the moment. Your eyes—and your mind—will thank you. (For more information see Cyber Eyes.)

Source: http://www.yogajournal.com/

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Get your zen on with these stress-reducing yoga moves and breathing tips

By Sara Reistad-Long Posted March 09, 2010 from Woman’s Day April 1 2010

Ready to relax but don’t know where to start? Natasha Korshak, director of Mindfulness Education at the Miraval Resort in Tucson, Arizona, gives her top yoga-inspired stress-busting solutions.

1. Lie down on your back on a bed or mat, keeping your legs bent so your stomach and lower back stay relaxed. To get additional back support, you can let your calves rest on the seat of a chair (try turning it sideways for even more surface area) or you can prop your legs up on a wall. Keep your forehead and chin horizontal, supporting your head with a small cushion or pillow if necessary. Because we sit and hunch a lot, lying down has a bit of a backbend effect on the system—opening the front body, freeing the breath, restoring the flow of energy to organs and quieting the mind. Even a minute or two on the ground can be effective.

2. Stand leaning against a wall and walk your feet a foot or so away from it. Position your feet hip width apart and bend your knees slightly. Exhale and fold your torso forward and down, keeping your hips against the wall and letting your upper body hang over your legs. Let your arms drape down and shake your head “yes” and “no” a few times to help release neck tension. Take 3 to 5 slow inhalations and exhalations, emphasizing the exhalations, then slowly roll up vertebra by vertebra.

3. Focus on the exhale more than the inhale. Inhale and then exhale slowly and deliberately, letting go of the breath as completely as possible. Take 5 to 15 breaths this way. Most people find that the inhale gets deeper and fuller, too.

4. Breathe through your nose (with your mouth closed). Visualize breathing in and straight back into the center of the head, then breathing out from the center of the head. Do this for 5 to 15 breaths. This has a direct and soothing effect on the nervous system.

source: www.womansday.com

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